Dry mouth

Do you suffer from dry mouth?

Dry mouth, or ‘xerostomia’, affects one in five adults in the UK, according to Professor Avijit Banerjee of King’s College London. 

It may sound like a relatively harmless condition, but actually having reduced levels of saliva can have detrimental effects on the health of your mouth and especially your teeth. 


water by bed

How dry mouth can impact your teeth.

We spoke to two Denplan patients to find out about their experiences of dry mouth, and how we helped them to manage the condition.

Michael, 68, was recently diagnosed with Sjögren's Syndrome, which causes dry mouth and eyes.


 

Marie, 75, suffers from dry mouth as a result of taking prescription medication.                              




About Dry Mouth

Why does it happen?
There are several reasons for dry mouth, one of the most common being a side effect of taking a variety of prescription medications.

As we get older our saliva flow can reduce too, so we could all benefit from knowing more about what to do if we are suffering from dry mouth.

What are the symptoms of dry mouth?

A big issue affecting dry mouth sufferers is the negative effect on their overall quality of life. A lack of normal quantity and quality of saliva in the mouth can adversely affect many of the everyday mouth functions that we take for granted.

This includes being able to swallow effectively, taste, control of oral infections and protecting teeth from dental decay. As the effects are more severe at night, sufferers may complain of regular broken sleep and tiredness.

How can the condition be managed?

If you suffer from dry mouth you should visit your dental team regularly, as you may have a higher risk of dental caries (decay), soft tissue soreness (like ulcers), and gum problems due to the condition.

Your dentist may wish to prescribe ‘artificial saliva’ or work alongside a specialist at a dental hospital to care for your condition depending on the severity.

How can we help?
Click here to find a member dentist near you.